Tag Archives: spring break

George M. Steinbrenner Field

My brother and I at George M. Steinbrenner Field

My brother and I at George M. Steinbrenner Field

As college spring breakers are flocking to the tropical beaches of Florida, it seems like the perfect time to share my Spring Break 2k15 adventure. While most college students pile their friends into a car and trek down to either Panama City Beach or Miami, with the intent of spending the week pounding beers on a beach, I took a more sophisticated approach. My parents and I made a last minute decision to fly down to Tampa, Florida, and then drive up to Thomasville, Georgia to visit my brother, then back down to Tampa (with my brother) to watch a Yankees vs Pirates spring training game, and then finally fly back to the pristine, yet a little colder, shores of Lake Erie. The main attraction for me on this voyage was, with-out-a-doubt, experiencing the wonders of spring training, even if it was with the New York Yankees. Of course, the Cleveland Indians spring training would be ideal to attend, but I’ll have to save that for another year (aka, next spring break). In the meantime though, a spring training game at George M. Steinbrenner Field was a great way to spend my spring break.

Monument Park outside George M. Steinbrenner Park, containing plaques honoring the great players in Yankee history.

Monument Park outside the stadium, containing plaques honoring the great players in Yankee history

The statue of George M. Steinbrenner outside the stadium

The statue of George M. Steinbrenner outside the stadium

Pulling into the parking area, it was apparent that baseball was in the air. From tailgaters to ticket scalpers, believe me when I say, people take this whole spring training thing quite seriously. The parking area was directly in front of Raymond James Stadium, the home of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Then to get to the baseball field, we crossed a pedestrian bridge over Dale Mabry Highway. Before finding our seats, we meandered around outside the stadium for a short time, making stops to see the retired numbers of Yankee greats at the mini Monument Park, as well as the George M. Steinbrenner Statue.

History

The city of Tampa became the first spring training site located in Florida when the Chicago Cubs setup camp in 1913. For years the city hosted different Major League Baseball teams during spring training, along with various minor league teams throughout the summer. Then in 1988, the Cincinnati Reds moved training facilities, and the following year, the last minor league team followed suit, leaving the city void of a baseball team and venue. An end to that spring baseball drought was announced in 1993, when the Tampa Sports Authority revealed a deal to build a new spring training facility for the New York Yankees. After a short debate over location, it was decided that the new complex would be built directly across the Dale Mabry Highway from Tampa Stadium, the home of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at the time. On March 1, 1996, spring baseball was restored to the city when the Yankees hosted the Cleveland Indians. Today George M. Steinbrenner Field serves as home to the minor league Tampa Yankees, as well as the spring training location of the New York Yankees.

The “Legend”-ary Name

From the time of inception, the new ballpark was named Legends Field. On March 27, 2008, that name was changed to George M. Steinbrenner Field, in honor of long-time Yankees owner and Tampa resident, George Steinbrenner. At the time, Steinbrenner was in failing health, and later passed away in July 2010. To further honor the illustrious owner, a life-size bronze statue was erected at the stadium’s entrance in January 2011.

The Stadium Itself

With this view of the stadium, you can see the stadium's facade designed after Yankee Stadium's. Also, Raymond Jones Stadium is visible in the background

With this view, you can see the stadium’s facade designed after Yankee Stadium’s. Also, Raymond Jones Stadium is visible in the background

George M. Steinbrenner Field, with a seating capacity of 11,026, is an intimate venue when compared to its colossal Major League Baseball counterparts. When visiting the ballpark, fans can catch subtle nods to the storied Old Yankee Stadium. The field dimensions of the stadium precisely mirror those of the former Yankees home. Also, the grandstand facade was designed after that of the legendary stadium. On this specific trip, my attention was slightly less focused on the actual stadium and more about the atmosphere. Spring training should be on the list of must-sees for every avid baseball fan. It gives you a chance to see veteran players in a lighter environment, alongside prospects fighting to make the team. Spring training allows fans to see players in all different stages of their careers. One of the most intriguing aspects of my visit was hearing a cacophony of boos as well as cheers raining down every time Alex Rodriguez’s name was announced. In years prior, that mixture would have been solely applause. Spring Training gives you a great preview of the regular season, and from what I saw in that one game, the 2015 season will be quite a spectacle.

%d bloggers like this: